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Beverly Pressey, MS, RD, mom

Having a love for food and a concern for children, Beverly Pressey started her career in nutrition by cooking at a Seattle child care center and a kitchen catering to child care centers.  Since graduating from Bastry University with a Masters Degree in Nutrition and becoming a Registered Dietician, she worked for the Seattle-King County Health Department for 3 years, Bellevue Community College Parent/ Infant Program for 10 years and the Jewish Community Center's Parenting Center for 5 years.

Recently Beverly completed a 9 month program at the University of Washington where she worked with children with special health care needs including children with failure to thrive, autism, and feeding issues and oral sensitivity.

As an experienced teacher and speaker, Beverly Pressey has presented at many conferences and taught classes at Overlake Hospital, Bastyr University, North Seattle Community College, Puget Consumer Cooperative, Seattle Conservation Corp and over 20 different child care centers. Her advice column has been a featured expert in many health and nutrition web sites such as Parents Connect, Dr. Laura and Baby Corner.  Beverly has also written the successful and go-to book, “Simple and Savvy Strategies for Creating Healthy Eaters”, a handbook for feeding children ages 6 months- 6 years.

Beverly speaks from experience.  After 17 years of practice she has observed thousands of children eating in different environments and enjoying a wide variety of foods.  This has given her a realistic understanding of infant/child eating patterns and behaviors.  She has also had opportunities to hear the personal and emotional frustrations some parents experience around food and meal time issues.

Just as important, Beverly Pressey is a mother of 2 children.  She eats with them, grocery shops with them and cooks with and for them.  She readily admits that they have taught her lessons that text books can not contain.  She understands parental struggles to insure a healthy diet, especially when raising a child with special health care needs, and too has been subjected to the excuses, negotiations and power struggles that children engage us in.  She knows how hard it is to get a meal on the table and the feelings of sadness and defeat when no one wants to eat it.  She will believe you when you tell her your child won't eat anything that feels too or looks too... (child’s adjective here).  With Beverly Pressey’s support, you will know that your children will eat and that you have competently done your job as a parent or care taker.

Beverly can help you find a solution that accommodates you, your children and your family, no matter what the need.  Where ever you need help, including scheduling, cooking, allergies, medically indicated diets, financial issues, food preferences, cultural differences, grocery selection, she can help you improve your family’s diet without causing family stress. 

Short Biography

Beverly Pressey, MS, RD, mom

Beverly Pressey is a Registered Dietician with Master’s degrees in Education and Nutrition and specializes in working with care givers of babies and children. Beverly has worked with individuals, presented at conferences, consulted with child care centers, taught continuing education and college classes, and presented at numerous parent groups. As an experienced counselor, cook, teacher, speaker and a mother of 2, she has a realistic understanding of infant/child eating patterns plus the perspective of a busy parent. Beverly lives in Seattle, Washington, find out more about her and her book at www.creatinghealthyeaters.com
Long Biography

Beverly Pressey, MS, RD, mom

Having a love for food and a concern for children, Beverly Pressey started her career in nutrition by cooking at a Seattle child care center and a kitchen catering to child care centers.  Since graduating from Bastry University with a Masters Degree in Nutrition and becoming a Registered Dietician, she worked for the Seattle-King County Health Department for 3 years, Bellevue Community College Parent/ Infant Program for 10 years and the Jewish Community Center's Parenting Center for 5 years.

Recently Beverly completed a 9 month program at the University of Washington where she worked with children with special health care needs including children with failure to thrive, autism, and feeding issues and oral sensitivity.

As an experienced teacher and speaker, Beverly Pressey has presented at many conferences and taught classes at Overlake Hospital, Bastyr University, North Seattle Community College, Puget Consumer Cooperative, Seattle Conservation Corp and over 20 different child care centers. Her advice column has been a featured expert in many health and nutrition web sites such as Parents Connect, Dr. Laura and Baby Corner.  Beverly has also written the successful and go-to book, “Simple and Savvy Strategies for Creating Healthy Eaters”, a handbook for feeding children ages 6 months- 6 years.

Beverly speaks from experience.  After 17 years of practice she has observed thousands of children eating in different environments and enjoying a wide variety of foods.  This has given her a realistic understanding of infant/child eating patterns and behaviors.  She has also had opportunities to hear the personal and emotional frustrations some parents experience around food and meal time issues.

Just as important, Beverly Pressey is a mother of 2 children.  She eats with them, grocery shops with them and cooks with and for them.  She readily admits that they have taught her lessons that text books can not contain.  She understands parental struggles to insure a healthy diet, especially when raising a child with special health care needs, and too has been subjected to the excuses, negotiations and power struggles that children engage us in.  She knows how hard it is to get a meal on the table and the feelings of sadness and defeat when no one wants to eat it.  She will believe you when you tell her your child won't eat anything that feels too or looks too... (child’s adjective here).  With Beverly Pressey’s support, you will know that your children will eat and that you have competently done your job as a parent or care taker.

Beverly can help you find a solution that accommodates you, your children and your family, no matter what the need.  Where ever you need help, including scheduling, cooking, allergies, medically indicated diets, financial issues, food preferences, cultural differences, grocery selection, she can help you improve your family’s diet without causing family stress. 

Beverly has a Master’s degree in Nutrition from Bastyr University and a Master’s degree in Higher Education Administration from the Ohio State University.  She is also a Registered Dietitcian.

Contact Beverly at Beverly@creatinghealthyeaters.com

 What others say about Beverly:
“Thank you for understanding just how exhausting and overwhelming parenting can be and helping us find easy, but healthy food choices.” Leslie

“…everything became achievable from balancing nutrition to setting limits at meal times.” Pauline

Talking Points
  • Feeding the First Year: When does an infant need to start on solid foods, and how does this process happen. What foods to offer and how much. What about choking, gagging and allergies? What is normal growth.
  • Age One: You can lead a child to food, but you can’t make them eat. Introduction to milk, aversions to vegetables and fruit, vegetarian and vegan children.
  • Exceptions to the Rules: Eating at restaurants, parties, buffets, in the car and on vacations or camping trips. Snack time, play dates or time with the grandparents or favorite relative.
  • Know What Foods To Buy: A primer of nutrition vocabulary, covering carbohydrates, proteins, fats. Decoding packaging labels and ingredients lists including headliner words such as “low fat”, “no cholesterol”, “no trans fats” and “organic”.
  • Efficient Shopping, Quick Cooking and Enjoyable Meals: Quick and easy family meals, meal planning, grocery shopping efficiency, food safety. 
  • Creating Healthy Eaters is Not a Discipline Issue: Teaching your child to eat healthy foods should not be a power struggle leading to disciplinary tactics, rewards or bribery. Creating a Healthy Eater is about helping a child to develop an emotionally healthy attitude about food for a life time. 

Beverly Pressey is a Registered Dietician with Master’s degrees in Education and Nutrition and specializes in working with care givers of babies and children. Beverly has worked with individuals, presented at conferences, consulted with child care centers, taught continuing education and college classes, and presented at numerous parent groups. As an experienced counselor, cook, teacher, speaker and a mother of 2, she has a realistic understanding of infant/child eating patterns plus the perspective of a busy parent. Beverly lives in Seattle, Washington, find out more about her and her book at www.creatinghealthyeaters.com.

Question & Answer
  • Your book is titled “Simple and Savvy Strategies for Creating Healthy Eaters”, what is a healthy eater?  A healthy eater is an infant, child or adult who eats when they are hungry and stops when they have had enough.  This simple concept becomes a tangled mess for many parents.
  • You say that creating healthy eaters is not about discipline, give some examples about this.  When a parent makes a child eat one more bite, or one pea this is not about nutrition.  That one bite is not the difference between a healthy and unhealthy child.  This is about who has the power.
  • What advice would you give to parents who are anxious to have their child eat nutritious foods.  I would encourage them to feed their child a variety of foods and let the child decide how much to eat or if they are going to eat or not.  There are strategies to encourage a child to choose healthier foods that don’t involve punishments or deceiving a child.
  • When and how do we start feeding our babies?  A baby lets you know when they are ready for solids, they will be watching you intently as you eat.  First foods need to be soft enough for a baby, but not liquid.  Rice cereal does not need to be the first food.
  • What about store bought versus home made baby foods?  Baby food from the store is convenient for when you leave the house, but they are not necessary for any baby.  There are so many real foods that are appropriate for new eaters.
  • How much food should a toddler eat?  As much as they want to eat, and not a bite more.
  • What should a parent do if their child refuses to eat?  Take the food away and let the child know there will be no more food until the next meal or snack.  The next meal or snack should be offered sooner than later for very young children (under 2 ) and before 2 ½ hours for older children.
  • How can we get everyone to eat the same dinner?  You can’t get everyone to eat the same dinner, but everyone should know that you are only serving one dinner.  They need to know that if they are hungry they can chose to eat what is served or not eat. 
  • Should a child have the option of a bowl of cereal if they don’t like the dinner?  No, children need to know that they can eat what is served or not eat.  A child that can always have cereal has no incentive to try a new or different food.
  • What about dessert, should a child who doesn’t eat the meal be offered dessert? If everyone is offered dessert, everyone including this child should be offered dessert.  If you didn’t, this would be punishing a child that doesn’t eat what you want them to eat.  A child should have the choice to eat or not.
  • Many parents are concerned about the child who doesn’t eat vegetables, should they be concerned and what can they do about this?  Variety is the key to nutritional health.  Never force a child to eat what they don’t want, but keep offering and let them see you eating these foods.
  • What about hiding vegetables inside of other foods?  Don’t botherNot only is this dishonest, it is time consuming.  Children will likely smell or taste these vegetables and rightly feel deceived.  Their trust in you is more important than a bite of vegetables.
  • Can a child drink too much milk? Yes, too much milk can fill a child up so they are not hungry for other foods.  Milk has calcium, protein and vitamin D, but it is not a meal replacement.  Our children need a variety of foods.
  • If dinner becomes too much of a battle, is it better to just let everyone eat on their own?  No, learn to stop battling by letting children decide to eat or not.  Studies show that children that ate 3 meals week with their family ate a healthier diet, had better grades, better self esteem, and were less likely to abuse drug and alcohol
Featured Appearances

Beverly Pressey, MS, RD, mom, is a dynamic speaker with humility and humor.  She is known for offering practical, factual and helpful information that is accessible to her audiences.   Beverly has spoken to various groups in many different settings.  She connects with her audiences because she understands what many of them are going through and offers realistic strategies that can be implemented by each audience member in an individual and unique manner. 

“I just wanted to give my endorsement to Beverly.  I went to see her speak recently and it has changed my family's life!  No more power-struggles at the table, no more picky eaters, and no more whining "I want cookies for dinner"!  Now my children eat their vegetables, fruits, grains, proteins, and my husband and I just sit back and relax.  And I don't even have to make special meals or steam and puree a bunch of vegetables.   She needs to be on Oprah!  Seriously!  If you get a chance to see her or get the book, it will be worth its weight in gold.

Jennifer Knickerbocker, mommy to 3 boys (former picky eaters)

Speaking Appearances:

Bellevue Community College Parent Education Program

North Seattle Community College Bastyr University  Vegfest

Northwest Conference of Food Service Workers   The Little School

Faces East Bright Horizon Corporation YMCA Hilltop Child Care

The Woodinville Toddler Group Redmond Cooperative Redmond Toddler Group

Moms and Me The Jewish Community Center Magnolia Moms EMOMS

Kirkland Cooperative Preschool The Montessori Children’s House Thriftway Foods

PEPS (Program for Early Parent Support) Puget Consumer Cooperative Stroller Striders

Seattle Conservation Corps Open Window School Wonderland Development Center

Swedish Hospital   Puyallup Tribal Health

Featured Website Expert

www.drlaura.com/ www.parentsconnect.com/ www.diet.com/ www.seattletimes.com/

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www.BlueSuitMom.com/ www.BrandNewDad.com/ www.Cleverparents.com/

www.MomtoBeDepot.com/ www.parentingbookmark.com/ www.womensweb.ca/

www.parentmindfully.com mercerisland.macaronikid.com

www.momtobedepot.com/ www.ParentSuperSite.com/ www.womenof.com/

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